Mexico

Getting to know the Yucatan Peninsula

  • — Izamal
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  • — Ek Balam
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  • — Making tortillas
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  • — Celestun, near Merida
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  • — Laguna Bacalar
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  • — Hacienda
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  • — Festivals
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  • — Traditional dance
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  • — Church
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  • — Day of the Dead
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  • — Chichen Itza
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  • — Cenote
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  • — Flamingos
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  • — Tulum
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  • — Tacos & salsa
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  • — Uxmal
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  • — Holbox
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  • — Religion
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  • — Campeche
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  • — Coba
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Land of the Maya

Jutting out between the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean, the Yucatan Peninsula is, thanks to its broad appeal, the most visited region of Mexico.

Comprising three separate states – Yucatan, Campeche & Quintana Roo – the majority of visitors to the Yucatan Peninsula are drawn to the beautiful beaches and turquoise waters that line much of its east coast.

However, it is inland from these beaches that more adventurous visitors will be richly rewarded.

Home to the enigmatic Mayan civilisation that stretched into neighbouring Belize, Guatemala & Honduras, the Yucatan Peninsula is home to a simply staggering number of ancient archaeological sites that range in size from great city-states such as Chichen Itza & Uxmal to smaller, lesser known settlements such as Kohunlich, all the way down to tiny, often un-named ruins hidden away from public view on private estates.

In tandem with these fascinating Mayan sites, the Yucatan Peninsula also bears witness to hundreds of years of Spanish, colonial history in the form of attractive towns such as Valladolid, Izamal, Merida & Campeche together a number of beguiling haciendas, many lying abandoned, the lucky ones now converted into luxury hotels.

Geographically, the Yucatan Peninsula is almost entirely flat with the dry, scrub-like terrain of the north gradually giving way to the dense jungles of the south. As the Yucatan Peninsula is almost entirely comprised of porous limestone, away from the coast there are few visible signs of water.

What the Yucatan Peninsula does possess is an incredible system of underground rivers and lakes which, where the ground has caved in become what is known as cenotes.

Although much of the east coast has been given over to tourist development, the Sian Ka’an Biosphere is still home to a variety of flora and fauna while Rio Lagartos on the north coast and Celestun on the east coast are also home to a wide variety of birdlife.

Yucatan Peninsula Destinations

The Yucatan Peninsula is home to countless, ancient Mayan sites, charming colonial towns and mile after mile of beautiful beaches

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Accommodation in the Yucatan Peninsula

The Yucatan Peninsula features characterful heritage hotels, luxurious haciendas and every type of beach hotel.

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Yucatan Peninsula Itineraries

Currently, we offer clients a choice between Fly Drive or Car & Driver as options for exploring the Yucatan Peninsula

When to visit Mexico

  • January

    14°C
  • February

    16°C
  • March

    18°C
  • April

    20°C
  • May

    22°C
  • June

    24°C
  • July

    25°C
  • August

    25°C
  • September

    24°C
  • October

    22°C
  • November

    14°C
  • December

    14°C
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Make your next holiday Beyond The Ordinary

Whichever of our featured countries you wish to visit, we've been there several times. So, if you're after something beyond the ordinary to Cuba, Guatemala or the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico, we'd love to hear from you.

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